Need Some Inspiration in This Time of Challenge?

The world is in turmoil. The news media is full of over-blown hype about it. Perhaps you need some inspiration.

A few suggestions:

  • Turn off the TV
  • Put down the newspaper
  • Read, or re-read, my recent posts on The Unity Community. The open rates for these messages currently stand at 18-21%. This tells me there are many of you who have yet to benefit from them. I refer to:
  • Listen to Eric Lofholm’s live (7:45 AM PT every business day) or recorded 15-minute motivational calls. The recordings and the instructions to join the live call are here. Eric is always upbeat and shares valuable business and sales tips, as well as pure inspiration.
  • (For those with children under 20: Eric has just announced he is doing a special daily training for kids. Most schools don’t teach kids mindset, goal setting, effective communication, etc. Eric is filling that space at a time when kids need it most. I just watched today’s episode and recommend it.)

Mindset is vital. It always works best to approach any situation, however dire it appears, with a positive attitude. There’s a positive side to every situation. Focusing on the negatives will only depress you.  It will do absolutely nothing to improve the situation, or your own performance.

You must be positive to perform at your best. 

You can be positive only by eliminating the negative. 

It’s impossible for the brain to recognize positive and negative simultaneously. Focus on the positive.

Fear and faith cannot co-exist (Napoleon Hill). Have faith that you will do what is necessary. Then do it!

Be aware of facts. Intentionally avoid the hype.

When you can do something to help, do it. When the situation is out of your control, worry won’t help. Move on to whatever good you find. Can’t find it? Look harder – it’s there.

In this time, we can appreciate these observations:

  • Some down time is a good thing.
  • Quiet time with family is good.
  • More relaxed interaction with friends is beneficial.
  • More time to think about and plan for our business and life will have long-term benefit.
  • It’s pretty easy to reduce expenses when we’re not moving around much, restaurants are closed, etc.
  • We may learn more effective or efficient ways of working while our mobility is limited. Example: We have essentially 0 commute time and expense.
  • Think of other benefits!

Stay positive! Better times are coming.

All Work and no Play Makes Jack a Dull Boy

As an entrepreneur, you’re probably very good at working hard. Many fail see the value of taking a break. Here’s Rebekah Lyons, in an interview with Alex Sanfelippo, describing a more balanced approach. The interview is about 34 minutes long. On the linked page there’s a brief outline of what she covers.

It’s very easy for a business owner, or anyone driven to succeed, to buy into the “work harder” syndrome.

The truth is, if you keep your head down for much more than an hour, your effectiveness diminishes. When you’re working, or concentrating on other routines in your life, it’s important to take breaks. 

I have to admit I sometimes violate this. I can get engrossed in writing and lose two or three hours very easily. I do my best to guard against that, and it still happens.

The most effective breaks come in several varieties. You should be intentional about taking:

  • 10-minute breaks during the day after 50-70 minutes of focused work.
  • A full day off from work each week.
  • A several-day, or even several-week vacation at least once per quarter.

In the hourly short breaks, some physical activity boosts the level of serotonin. 

Serotonin is known as the “feel-good hormone”. It helps you feel energized and upbeat, so you can return to focused work with renewed vigor. 

Levels of serotonin gradually decline during sedentary work. This can leave you feeling dull or lethargic. Physical activity restores your serotonin level – walking or other light exercise is ideal for this.

Your work keeps you physically active, you say? You still need the mental break to stay energetic and ideally focused.

Here’s a very good article on serotonin and melatonin, which work pretty much opposite to each other.

In Rebekah’s interview she talks about rhythms everywhere in life. In the world of work, she discusses:

Rest and Restore, which she places in the category of input rhythms.

Connect and Create, which she calls output rhythms.

Want a more effective work day? Want to get more done in a month? Follow Rebekah’s advice to bring more balance into your routine.

Many studies have shown it. You can do more in 6.5-7 hours, net of breaks, than in 8-9 hours of unbroken effort.

What Will Help You Most to Navigate Hard Times?

This month seems to be developing into a time of philosophical exploration. Last week we discussed Wayne Dyer’s wise life improvement suggestions. This week, I go  back a little further in history (about 700 years!) for for some Persian wisdom on life.

Yalal ad-Din Muhammad Rumi, better known simply as Rumi, was a 13th-century Persian poet, faqih, Islamic scholar, theologian, and Sufi mystic.

Nikos, who has commented on several of my articles, recently sent me 75 Rumi quotes. Most of them are worthy of thoughtful note. In the list, every 10th one is highlighted. There are many nuggets of wisdom in the entire list. For different people, different ones will have the biggest impact. I won’t try to select for you.

All of this advice, no matter the source, essentially comes down to positive mindset. Travel restrictions, wild stock market fluctuations, etc., can lead one to think negatively. We have no control over those things. One thing we can always control is our mindset. Keeping a positive mindset helps us through the toughest of times. In a positive mindset we are much more effective at addressing what we can control.

Napoleon Hill famously said, “Fear and faith can’t co-exist.” Have faith that you can produce the results you want, and set fear aside.

Be positive and grateful.

Gratitude and Forgiveness are Everything

Dr. Wayne Dyer had one of the most balanced outlooks on life that I’ve ever found. I think he gave me the fundamentals that allow me to make the progress I’m making now.


For many years, while he was still alive, I listened to powerful ideas from Wayne. Though they were usually on cassette tapes, or later on CD’s, they always seemed to be alive. This man was larger than life! Here’s a great quick summary (just over 11 minutes) of some of his most powerful ideas. I just ran across this while viewing other things on YouTube.


Take these five principles to heart and live them. Your life will improve. If you’ve learned them before, this is an excellent refresher…From a man who knew them better than most. The 5 principles are:

  1. When life seems to be dealing you a bad hand, look inside. Each of us is responsible for our own life.
  2. There are no justified resentments.
  3. You become what you think about.
  4. Keep your mind open to everything, and attached to nothing.
  5. Don’t die with your music still in you. March to the drummer you hear.

Wayne died a little over 4 years ago. As he said in the presentation, his music was playing as he spoke. At that time I listened to a heartfelt eulogy by Reid Tracy, a long-time Dyer friend. It literally brought tears to my eyes. I just listened to it again. Once again I was overwhelmed. Powerful! 

The eulogy is 2-1/2 hours long. If you didn’t know him, you’ll likely find less impact in it than I did.   

There’s a 15-minute embedded clip (15:05-29:37) in the eulogy. In that clip Wayne tells the story of his life transformation:

He found his father’s grave 10 years after his father died. He hadn’t known of his father’s death before then. His father had abandoned the family when Wayne was too young to remember him. He’d become a drifter, a drunk, a waster. Wayne says, “I went there to piss [sic.] on his grave”. After he’d vented his anger for a couple of hours, he was getting in his car to leave. A voice called him to make peace with his father. He went back and, on the spot, forgave his father for everything. From then on he sent his father only love. 

A direct result: He also found a new direction in his own life and cleaned it up! He wrote and published a book in a year and a half.

The power of gratitude and forgiveness cannot be overstated! Here‘s something I wrote nearly 4 years ago (I found it wasn’t posted on my website, so I just posted it. Hence, the date stamp is from this week.) The style of the piece is not what I’d have written today, but I think the message is clear.

In my brief message here, I’ve referenced a lot of material. I hope you perceive sufficient value to check some of it out! 

At least the two videos of Dyer, linked in the second and seventh(15:05-29:37) paragraphs.

Is the healing power of gratitude and forgiveness new to you? If so, I promise this will be huge for you!

Gratitude can Heal all Wounds! (From 2 May 2016)

In this issue I introduce you to my friend and fellow coach Star Dargin, of Star Leadership, who talks about the importance of gratitude in this message. She finds, in the seemingly unpleasant experience of suffering a broken ankle, many aspects of the experience to appreciate. As she ably points out, expressing gratitude can transform your life into a more enjoyable, more productive, more balanced, way forward.


So what are you grateful for today? What can you discover, in an apparently obnoxious event, for which to thank whatever gods may be? If you become a more grateful person, you’ll find your performance flourishing, and you’ll enjoy life more to boot.


As regular readers know, I always invite your comments via telephone (schedule a call at https://unitycopywriting.com/lets-talk) or email ([email protected]) on any of my work.. Care to talk about something you’ve found to be grateful for in an experience that seems on its face to be disastrous?

When to Delegate the BIG Role (CEO)?

Sarah Kauss is the founder of S’well, a company producing personal convenience items. As the company grew, she realized she needed to turn the operating reins over to a new manager. Then she could focus on executive decisions.

As a company founder, this can be one of the toughest decisions you face. After all, It’s your company, right? Your baby! 

For a leader, recognizing when it’s time to let go of day-to-day details is important. Especially if you want the company to continue growing and improving.

Kauss had decided it was time. She needed space to consider new opportunities, broader markets and partnerships.

So whom could she count on to handle this? Another tough decision. She didn’t see anyone on her team that she deemed capable of it.

Here’s Kimberly Weisul‘s account of what happened next.

A quick summary: After a year-long+ search she found the guy she picked as the perfect fit.

  • He had experience in a similar business sector.
  • He’d worked with founder-led companies.
  • He was available.

So she hired him.

Her biggest regret about the process? She spent too much time searching traditional channels before she turned to people she knew.

Her biggest concern? Might I forget his and my new roles and undermine him?

A month into the new arrangement, it seems to be going well. I’ve made a note to check back in a year or so, and offer an update.

Read the details of the story here.