Thanks to all Those Who’ve Commented!

During the past several days I’ve received 100’s of comments on my articles. This is a sudden increase and I’m not sure of the reason why, but I’m very grateful.

Many have been very complimentary. Several have offered suggestions for improving my work, like using more pictures and videos. While I don’t have time to answer you all individually, I appreciate every one of those comments, with the exception noted below. I thank you for them.

Several of the comments requested advice on blogging or other aspects of writing. I’ll comment generally with the following resources:

  • Go Daddy is a great place to get started with a website for very little cost.
  • American Writers and Artists Institute offers great training and other resources for all kinds of writing.
  • Having trouble with punctuation, spelling and syntax? Paste your text into Fletcher-Kincaid. You can set up a single user account for peanuts. They’ll help you identify things that could embarrass you later!
  • For those asking about other relevant material to read, many of my articles contain links to other writers who have useful ideas. Check ’em out!
  • If you’d like to be a subscriber (free) and ensure you get my articles when I write them, send me the email address where you want me to send it, or go to http://bit.ly/37PCOM9 and enter your information.
  • You’re always welcome to link to my posts in your own writing. Please do not copy and paste excerpts – that’s plagiarism, and not appreciated.
  • If you’d like to submit something for me to include in a future article, please send it along. If I use it, I promise I’ll give you credit for it when I use it.
  • Some of you have asked about help with SEO. Yoast offers training on SEO and a tool that scans your posts and other work to advise you of issues you can correct to improve your site’s visibility to search engines.

One other thing I should mention – if your comment is a sales pitch or promotion unrelated to the article where you’re posting the comment, I’ll leave it unapproved. Don’t bother posting those messages.

If you have other thoughts or comments, feel free to email me or schedule a phone call.

Thanks again to all who are contributing to this site. I appreciate you.

Think about What You Want!

Again in this article, we’ll touch on mental attitude. If some of you find these mindset messages are more frequent than you prefer, I apologize. It seems to me one can’t be reminded too often to stay focused on what you can do to make your life better. In times like these it’s doubly important. There’s a lot of negative conversation out there. Ignore it.

That means it’s important to avoid focusing on negative things. Avoiding negative focus means avoiding the mainstream news. Your mind can accommodate negative, or positive, but not both at the same time. I recommend you stay informed with a news source that reports facts. It should avoid pictures and language designed to anger or scare you. I get a two-page summary of the news every morning from the Wall Street Journal. It pretty well follows these guidelines. There are links to every article in the day’s issue. The full articles can be inflammatory. However, the one- or two-line descriptions give a pretty good idea what’s happening without over-hyping it.

The TV network news programs are designed to sell juicy stories, rather than to inform. I recommend skipping them altogether.

One of Zig Ziglar’s well-known reminders is (paraphrased): Inspiration is like bathing. It should be renewed daily.

Today’s link takes us to another episode of Eric Lofholm’s daily inspirational conference call. Bailey Cooper guest-hosts this one. It discusses one of Napoleon Hill’s success principles, keeping a positive mental attitude.

Napoleon Hill wrote Think and Grow Rich in the 1930s, during the Great Depression. He studied the habits of many of the great business minds of the time. Henry Ford and Andrew Carnegie are there, along with many others. He condensed their practices into 17 success principles. Keeping a positive mental attitude is one of them. Hill’s great book is on every business success oriented reading list I remember seeing. It’s still available on Amazon.

Eric Lofholm’s daily inspirational call happens at 7:45 AM, Pacific time. Every episode is recorded and posted here. This page also has instructions for joining the call by various methods.

That’s enough from me. Enjoy, and learn from, Napoleon Hill’s success principles. I hope you find Eric Lofholm’s inspiration beneficial as well. Here’s the link again to the episode I refer to in this message.

Get More Done, with More Love, More Calm, More Focus

Mary Lynn Ziemer reminds us to be patient as the route to a calmer mindset and better performance.

Eric Lofholm talked this morning (see the 05.25.20 post) about how to avoid overload. Among his “staying positive” tips are to focus on what’s at hand now, in each moment. Then, in the next moment, focus on what’s to be done in that moment. Thinking about everything you have to do today, or this week, creates overload. Focusing on one thing at a time eliminates overload. Thinking about the day’s or week’s work Is for planning the day or week before it begins.

Ziemer’s and Lofholm’s reminders are very closely linked. In order to keep the focus Eric recommends, you must have the inner calm and patience Mary Lynn recommends. Impatience can easily lead to trying to focus on more than one thing – not very effective. The whole concept of focus is lost when when the “focus” is on several things, instead of one.

To reach the inner calm, she suggests feeling more love. She recommends a step-by-step method to help you do this.

This progression from love to calm to patience to focus on the task at hand is all about mindset. Many people, especially some who want to move fast and furiously, are impatient with the concept of mindset. They think “I don’t have time to work on mindset. I just want to get on with action”. That approach may feel effective in the moment. It leads to trying to “multi-task”, and ultimately to overload. It’s been shown time and again that multi-tasking is ineffective.

To explore other aspects of mindset, you may want to explore my March, April and May posts. We’ve focused on mindset from many points of view, as we considered how to weather the COVID-19 challenge. What works in the most challenging times serves you well any time as you strive to be more effective.

Are You a Problem Solver?

In this article, I turn again to Dennis Hooper. You may remember him from a few months ago. His topic then was how to choose a coach.Dennis has experience in large organizations and in small ones. He loves helping people work together in harmony. 

Dennis recently caught my eye with this article on the subject of giving advice. His point is, whatever value you see in your advice, it’s important to be careful where you offer it. Be sure it’s welcome. If you’re not sure, ask. He suggests some language for how to ask.

Just in the past week, I saw a chance to “help” someone through a social situation. Another friend suggested I think about how my help would be received. I decided against it because I wasn’t sure if my suggestions would be welcome.  If they aren’t they won’t help. In the coming days or weeks, perhaps I’ll see an opportunity to ask about that.

This situation planted the seed that grew into this issue of The Unity Community. Dennis’ article added impetus to the idea.

This newsletter offers advice and suggestions nearly every week. You have all implicitly invited my advice by subscribing to the letter. If you prefer not to receive my advice, please feel free to click the “unsubscribe” link at the bottom of this message. Every week, one or two people do that. It doesn’t trouble me at all. What I offer isn’t for everyone. I’m interested in being helpful and supportive, to those who want help.

In his message, Dennis offers Tony Alessandra’s “platinum rule”, an embellishment of the “golden rule”. The golden rule says “Treat others as you would like to be treated”. The platinum rule changes one word in that: “Treat others as they would like to be treated”. Of course sometimes you don’t know exactly how they’d like to be treated. It’s safer to ask than to assume your input is welcome.

In a recent effort to better define my personal mission, I arrived, after some thought, at:

“I make a positive contribution to every transaction and relationship I participate in.”

In pursuit of that mission, I had arrived at the platinum rule myself, though I didn’t so name it. I think “platinum rule” is an excellent name, and I thank Tony for coining it, and Dennis for offering the rule as guidance.

Think carefully about where you share suggestions and advice. However helpful you think an idea to be, it may be unwelcome to someone else. You won’t be helping if you make them feel inadequate. You won’t improve anything if they see you as invading their privacy. As helpful as you may think you are, offering advice where it’s unwelcome won’t help anyone. It may damage or even destroy a relationship.

Enjoy Dennis’ advice here, if you’re open to it.

Who Makes You Happy?

(Published in The Unity Community in June 2018)

Last year (2017) I discussed here some aspects of happiness and its causes (hint: look in the mirror). 

This week, we’ll take another look at what leads to happiness from a slightly different perspective, and arrive at the same conclusion. You can choose to be happy…or not, independent of outside factors. Sure, you won’t feel very happy when a loved one has a bad accident or dies. You’ll react to such events from a much stabler base, though, if you’re a fundamentally happy person. And you can decide right now to be that person.

In large part being internally happy is the result of living life with integrity, knowing you’re doing the right thing in your own honest opinion. 

Not someone else’s opinion

Not because it looks good to someone (or everyone) else

But because you know it’s right.

Do you enjoy your own company? That’s a pretty good test!

Your reaction to external factors (relationships with people, things, or achievements) are the  results of true internal happiness, rather than the causes.

Want to be Happier?

Here’s Rose Walker, a coach I recently “met” on LinkedIn,  discussing the “proper” source of happiness

Many people tend to depend for their happiness on their significant other, their friends, their parents, their children, even their compatriots at work.

Get this! In all things in life, YOU are responsible. Other people, possessions, achievements, travel experiences, etc, can certainly add spice to life.  Those enhancements are the icing on the cake. If the cake is not good, all the sweet icing in the world won’t make it good. 

Life is the same way. Adding nice relationships and experiences is great if you have a solid foundation as an internally happy person. Otherwise they’re empty and fleeting. No amount of them will make you happy. You’ve got to be happy first.

Need Some Inspiration in This Time of Challenge?

The world is in turmoil. The news media is full of over-blown hype about it. Perhaps you need some inspiration.

A few suggestions:

  • Turn off the TV
  • Put down the newspaper
  • Read, or re-read, my recent posts on The Unity Community. The open rates for these messages currently stand at 18-21%. This tells me there are many of you who have yet to benefit from them. I refer to:
  • Listen to Eric Lofholm’s live (7:45 AM PT every business day) or recorded 15-minute motivational calls. The recordings and the instructions to join the live call are here. Eric is always upbeat and shares valuable business and sales tips, as well as pure inspiration.
  • (For those with children under 20: Eric has just announced he is doing a special daily training for kids. Most schools don’t teach kids mindset, goal setting, effective communication, etc. Eric is filling that space at a time when kids need it most. I just watched today’s episode and recommend it.)

Mindset is vital. It always works best to approach any situation, however dire it appears, with a positive attitude. There’s a positive side to every situation. Focusing on the negatives will only depress you.  It will do absolutely nothing to improve the situation, or your own performance.

You must be positive to perform at your best. 

You can be positive only by eliminating the negative. 

It’s impossible for the brain to recognize positive and negative simultaneously. Focus on the positive.

Fear and faith cannot co-exist (Napoleon Hill). Have faith that you will do what is necessary. Then do it!

Be aware of facts. Intentionally avoid the hype.

When you can do something to help, do it. When the situation is out of your control, worry won’t help. Move on to whatever good you find. Can’t find it? Look harder – it’s there.

In this time, we can appreciate these observations:

  • Some down time is a good thing.
  • Quiet time with family is good.
  • More relaxed interaction with friends is beneficial.
  • More time to think about and plan for our business and life will have long-term benefit.
  • It’s pretty easy to reduce expenses when we’re not moving around much, restaurants are closed, etc.
  • We may learn more effective or efficient ways of working while our mobility is limited. Example: We have essentially 0 commute time and expense.
  • Think of other benefits!

Stay positive! Better times are coming.

What Will Help You Most to Navigate Hard Times?

This month seems to be developing into a time of philosophical exploration. Last week we discussed Wayne Dyer’s wise life improvement suggestions. This week, I go  back a little further in history (about 700 years!) for for some Persian wisdom on life.

Yalal ad-Din Muhammad Rumi, better known simply as Rumi, was a 13th-century Persian poet, faqih, Islamic scholar, theologian, and Sufi mystic.

Nikos, who has commented on several of my articles, recently sent me 75 Rumi quotes. Most of them are worthy of thoughtful note. In the list, every 10th one is highlighted. There are many nuggets of wisdom in the entire list. For different people, different ones will have the biggest impact. I won’t try to select for you.

All of this advice, no matter the source, essentially comes down to positive mindset. Travel restrictions, wild stock market fluctuations, etc., can lead one to think negatively. We have no control over those things. One thing we can always control is our mindset. Keeping a positive mindset helps us through the toughest of times. In a positive mindset we are much more effective at addressing what we can control.

Napoleon Hill famously said, “Fear and faith can’t co-exist.” Have faith that you can produce the results you want, and set fear aside.

Be positive and grateful.

Gratitude and Forgiveness are Everything

Dr. Wayne Dyer had one of the most balanced outlooks on life that I’ve ever found. I think he gave me the fundamentals that allow me to make the progress I’m making now.


For many years, while he was still alive, I listened to powerful ideas from Wayne. Though they were usually on cassette tapes, or later on CD’s, they always seemed to be alive. This man was larger than life! Here’s a great quick summary (just over 11 minutes) of some of his most powerful ideas. I just ran across this while viewing other things on YouTube.


Take these five principles to heart and live them. Your life will improve. If you’ve learned them before, this is an excellent refresher…From a man who knew them better than most. The 5 principles are:

  1. When life seems to be dealing you a bad hand, look inside. Each of us is responsible for our own life.
  2. There are no justified resentments.
  3. You become what you think about.
  4. Keep your mind open to everything, and attached to nothing.
  5. Don’t die with your music still in you. March to the drummer you hear.

Wayne died a little over 4 years ago. As he said in the presentation, his music was playing as he spoke. At that time I listened to a heartfelt eulogy by Reid Tracy, a long-time Dyer friend. It literally brought tears to my eyes. I just listened to it again. Once again I was overwhelmed. Powerful! 

The eulogy is 2-1/2 hours long. If you didn’t know him, you’ll likely find less impact in it than I did.   

There’s a 15-minute embedded clip (15:05-29:37) in the eulogy. In that clip Wayne tells the story of his life transformation:

He found his father’s grave 10 years after his father died. He hadn’t known of his father’s death before then. His father had abandoned the family when Wayne was too young to remember him. He’d become a drifter, a drunk, a waster. Wayne says, “I went there to piss [sic.] on his grave”. After he’d vented his anger for a couple of hours, he was getting in his car to leave. A voice called him to make peace with his father. He went back and, on the spot, forgave his father for everything. From then on he sent his father only love. 

A direct result: He also found a new direction in his own life and cleaned it up! He wrote and published a book in a year and a half.

The power of gratitude and forgiveness cannot be overstated! Here‘s something I wrote nearly 4 years ago (I found it wasn’t posted on my website, so I just posted it. Hence, the date stamp is from this week.) The style of the piece is not what I’d have written today, but I think the message is clear.

In my brief message here, I’ve referenced a lot of material. I hope you perceive sufficient value to check some of it out! 

At least the two videos of Dyer, linked in the second and seventh(15:05-29:37) paragraphs.

Is the healing power of gratitude and forgiveness new to you? If so, I promise this will be huge for you!

Gratitude can Heal all Wounds! (From 2 May 2016)

In this issue I introduce you to my friend and fellow coach Star Dargin, of Star Leadership, who talks about the importance of gratitude in this message. She finds, in the seemingly unpleasant experience of suffering a broken ankle, many aspects of the experience to appreciate. As she ably points out, expressing gratitude can transform your life into a more enjoyable, more productive, more balanced, way forward.


So what are you grateful for today? What can you discover, in an apparently obnoxious event, for which to thank whatever gods may be? If you become a more grateful person, you’ll find your performance flourishing, and you’ll enjoy life more to boot.


As regular readers know, I always invite your comments via telephone (schedule a call at https://unitycopywriting.com/lets-talk) or email ([email protected]) on any of my work.. Care to talk about something you’ve found to be grateful for in an experience that seems on its face to be disastrous?

Music Often Reflects Business

Like much entertainment, music often reflects the realities of life and business. 


This week, we check in with Mark Oldman, entrepreneur, Inc. contributor, and author. He finds many parallels between the lyrics of Neil Peart’s Rush band and the company he co-founded, Vault.com.


As many of you know, Peart died last month. Oldman has been a loyal follower of Neil Peart and Rush for many years. His recent article is a tribute to the ideas reflected in Rush’s songs. It also catalogs many of the lessons he’s learned in business. You’ll find parallels to Ami Kassar’s experience, which we discussed here.


What makes a song popular? It’s usually its reflection of realities in life and/or business.


The lessons Mark relates to Rush’s lyrics are:

1. “Resist safety”.

2. Pursue your passion.

3. Choose complementary co-founders.

4. Progress is incremental.

5. Say no.

6. Prepare to pivot.

7. Assume control.

Oldman selects a passage from one of Rush’s songs to illustrate each principle. Common themes for them are:

  • Control your destiny.
  • Find what excites you – and focus on it.
  • Pay attention to what the market is telling you, and be prepared to react. The best reaction may be saying no to an apparent opportunity (shiny object).

Enjoy Mark’s comparisons between Neil Peart’s music and the realities of business.