New Year, New Habits!

Which of your habits (we all have many!) are serving you well? Which are detrimental for you? What new habits would you like to establish?

Want to :

  • Quit smoking?
  • Lose weight?
  • Make your bed every morning?
  • Eat a small amount of healthy chocolate each day?

Last week I got a recommendation for a book which I’m pretty sure will change my life.

What causes habits to form, or disappear? This book, by B.J. Fogg, can probably help you make some worthwhile adjustments as well. Fogg analyzes habits. What causes them to form, disappear, or change.

He analyzes what makes it possible to adopt habits without difficulty. His core principle is B=M+A+P.

Behavior results from

  • Motivation to do something – what makes you want to do it. You want to lose weight.
  • Ability – how easy it is to do. Often that’s one ridiculously easy step. You put half a teaspoon less sugar in your coffee. A new behavior is easier if you reduce the practice to a tiny fraction of your full intent.
  • Prompt – a natural, easy key to remind yourself to do it. Tie a ribbon on the handle of the sugar spoon, or on the handle of your coffee cup. It’s actually better if the reminder is something already in your routine. E. g. you sit down at the breakfast table, or you pour your coffee.

At times when motivation is low (happens for all of us!) doing the easy minimum meets your obligation. You can still congratulate yourself on accomplishing your new habit.

Fogg has many more nuances to refine the process of establishing new habits.

Do you aspire to building new habits or eliminating others, to change your life? I recommend you explore BJ Fogg’s recommendations.

They provide a great alternative to “resolutions” which are often forgotten after a few weeks or months.

When to Delegate the BIG Role (CEO)?

Sarah Kauss is the founder of S’well, a company producing personal convenience items. As the company grew, she realized she needed to turn the operating reins over to a new manager. Then she could focus on executive decisions.

As a company founder, this can be one of the toughest decisions you face. After all, It’s your company, right? Your baby! 

For a leader, recognizing when it’s time to let go of day-to-day details is important. Especially if you want the company to continue growing and improving.

Kauss had decided it was time. She needed space to consider new opportunities, broader markets and partnerships.

So whom could she count on to handle this? Another tough decision. She didn’t see anyone on her team that she deemed capable of it.

Here’s Kimberly Weisul‘s account of what happened next.

A quick summary: After a year-long+ search she found the guy she picked as the perfect fit.

  • He had experience in a similar business sector.
  • He’d worked with founder-led companies.
  • He was available.

So she hired him.

Her biggest regret about the process? She spent too much time searching traditional channels before she turned to people she knew.

Her biggest concern? Might I forget his and my new roles and undermine him?

A month into the new arrangement, it seems to be going well. I’ve made a note to check back in a year or so, and offer an update.

Read the details of the story here.